Science

journalism

2014

 

For more frequent updates, check the science journalism entries in my blog.

| books | research papers | science news | book reviews |

 

month

i n   E n g l i s h

i n   G e r m a n

Dec. 2014

(6/61)

    Nature's building blocks
    Chemistry & Industry December 2014, pp 18-21

    The price of renewables
    Chemistry & Industry December 2014, p 51
    review of the book The economic competitiveness of renewable energy - pathways to 100% global coverage, by Winfried Hoffmann

    Our shared burden of diseases
    (Ebola and other zoonoses)
    Current Biology Volume 24, Issue 24, pages R1139–R1141, 15 December 2014
    Open access

    Plant science called up to provide food security
    Current Biology
    Volume 24, Issue 23, pR1105–R1108, 1 December 2014
    Open access

    Mikrobielle Artenvielfalt unter dem Eis der Antarktis
    Nachrichten aus der Chemie 62, 1186-1187, 2014
    [related content in English]

    Die Wissenschaft vom Weihnachtsstern
    Nachrichten aus der Chemie 62, 1251, 2014

Nov. 2014

(2/55)

    How wild do you want to go?
    (on rewilding efforts)
    Current Biology Volume 24, Issue 22, pR1067–R1070, 17 November 2014
    Open access

    Will the Nicaragua Canal connect or divide?
    Current Biology Volume 24, Issue 21, pR1023–R1025, 3 November 2014
    Open access

    ...

Oct. 2014

(7/53)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry World No. 10, 21 (online 07.09.)
    Chemical synthesis for the masses
    [organic chemistry]
    [free access]

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry World 01.10.
    Viruses melt 'glassy' DNA
    [nanoworld]
    [free access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 19 (06.10.), R941-R944
    Shrinking ice caps in the spotlight
    From the disappearing sea ice of the Arctic to the thriving microbial communities in subglacial lakes of Antarctica, the Earth’s ice caps have often made the news in recent months and years, and polar science has emerged as being crucial to our understanding of our planet’s biology and climate.
    [antarctica]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 20 (20.10.), R983-R986
    New hope for gene therapy
    New vectors, new approaches, new disease targets and the first EU licence for a gene therapy have injected a much-needed dose of fresh hope into this field. Investment is flowing and further therapies are expected to follow.
    [medicine]
    [Open access]

Sep. 2014

(5/46)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 9, 24-27
    Stanene - the next miracle material?
    [nanoworld]

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 9, 51
    Power plants (review of: Handbook of cellulosic ethanol)
    [book review]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 17 (08.09.), R777-R780
    Paraphilia or perversion?
    Human sexual instincts can become fixated on a wide variety of targets, resulting in behaviours ranging from harmless fetishism to child abuse. The recent flood of investigations into historic cases in the UK has brought child protection issues to the top of the news agenda and shown that society is still far from addressing these problems in a rational, evidence-based way maximising harm reduction.
    [psychology]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 18 (22.09.), R851-R854
    Silver linings for patients with depression?
    Depression has become one of the biggest health problems globally, but in certain places more than in others, suggesting cultural as well as biological causes. Neuroscientists are only beginning to understand underlying processes and to develop effective treatments for those cases where conventional psychotherapy and drugs fail.
    [psychology]
    [Open access]

Aug. 2014

(3/41)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 8, 50-51
    A dumb solution? (review of Introduction to Carbon Capture and Sequestration)
    [book review]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 16 (18.08.), R717-720
    Systemic pesticide concerns extend beyond the bees
    Systemic pesticides, including the widely used neonicotinoids, have been linked to colony losses in honeybees and declines in other pollinator species. More recently, evidence has accumulated suggesting that their widespread, often prophylactic use is harming important parts of soil and water ecosystems, putting biodiversity and ecosystem services at risk.
    [environment]
    [Open access]

July 2014

(5/38)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 7, 32-35
    Fading pictures
    .
    [art]

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 7, 50-51
    Fractured opinion (review of: Hydrofracking: what everyone needs to know
    [book review]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 13 (07.07.), R583-R585
    Closing the carbon cycle
    Advances in photosynthesis research may help to find new ways of reconverting carbon dioxide into fuel, which would solve several global problems at once.
    [energy]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 14 (21.07.), R629-R632
    Connecting with the natural world
    Today’s technology, from smartphones to drones, provides researchers and conservation workers with many new and improved ways of observing and protecting wildlife.
    [ecology]
    [Open access]

June 2014

(7/33)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 6, 50-51
    Facts without passion (review of Demons - our changing attitudes to alcohol, tobacco and drugs by Virginia Berridge
    [book review]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 11 (03.06.), R503-R506
    Coffee and chocolate in danger
    As a rapidly growing global consumer base appreciates the pleasures of coffee and chocolate and health warnings are being replaced by more encouraging sounds from medical experts, their supply is under threat from climate change, pests and financial problems. Coffee farmers in Central America, in particular, are highly vulnerable to the impact of climate change, made worse by financial insecurity.
    [coffee]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 12 (16.06.), R541-R544
    Phage therapy for plants and people
    The use of bacteriophages to combat bacterial infections may help to address the current crisis of antibiotic resistance. Fundamental issues arising from the ecological dynamic of host, bacterium and phage can be investigated in trees, offering both a natural approach to treating plant disease, and a chance to avoid creating a new resistance problem.
    [ecology]
    [Open access]

May 2014

(4/26)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 5, 51
    A gel by any other name(review of: Physical gels from biological and synthetic polymers
    [book review]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 9 (05.05.), R341-R344
    Learning to live with sharks
    Many shark species are threatened by overfishing and by their bad reputation. Saving the top predators of the oceans will require that humans change their minds, learn to understand the ancient cartilaginous fishes, and learn to live with them. Sharks may even help us to better understand our own biology and find novel medical approaches.
    [ecology]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 10 (19.05.), R405-R408
    Chronic stress means we're always on the hunt
    Stress responses that evolved for occasional dangerous situations can make us ill when they become chronic. But why do we perceive our relatively safe lives as stressful and what can we do to avoid the associated dangers?
    [psychology]
    [Open access]

April 2014

(7/22)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 4, 42-45
    Biosensors in real time
    .
    [medicine]

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 7, 50-51
    The good fruit guide (review of: Bioactives in fruit
    [book review]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 7 (31.03.),
    New barriers to mobility in Europe?
    The political fallout of the referendum against ‘mass migration’ in Switzerland could damage the country’s reputation as a hub for international scientific collaboration. Worse still, by encouraging anti-immigration parties across Europe ahead of the European elections, it could ring in a new era of barriers to the exchange of people, skills and experience.
    [Europe]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 8 (14.04.), R295-R298
    The complicated origins of our species
    Advanced methods of sequencing ancient DNA provide unprecedented insights into the origins of our species, adding up to a much more complex picture than previously established models suggested.
    [Medizin]
    [Open access]

Mar. 2014

(3/15)

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 5 (03.03.), R175-R178
    The past and future habitablility of planet Mars
    Results from NASA’s Curiosity rover reveal traces of bygone aqueous environments with sufficiently benign conditions for some of Earth’s hardier extremophiles to thrive. If Mars hosted life in the past, it may do so again in the future, as a project to colonise our neighbour planet is now recruiting volunteers for the one-way trip
    [astrobiology]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 6 (17.03.), R209-R211
    Latin America's resources: Blessing or curse?
    Many of today’s poor countries are rich in natural resources but have been unable to capitalise on this wealth. To this day, the extractive industries attracted by gold, coal and oil are causing problems both for local populations and the natural environment, as recent developments in Ecuador and Colombia demonstrate.
    [Latin America]
    [Open access]

Feb. 2014

(5/12)

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 3 (03.02.), R97-R100
    Where next for China's population policy?
    After 34 years, China softens its one-child policy, responding to its dramatically altered circumstances and new demographic challenges.
    [ecology]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24 No 4 (17.02.), R137-R139
    The deep sea under siege
    Life has hardly got any place left to hide as even remote ecosystems on the deep ocean floor are affected by climate change, fisheries, and the quest for mineral resources.
    [environment]
    [Open access]

Jan. 2014

(7/7)

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 1, 24-27
    Fertile ground
    Challenges surrounding the use of the elements phosphorus and nitrogen in agriculture.
    [environment] [FREE access]

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry & Industry No 1, 50
    A pricey wager (Review of: The bet - Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon and our gamble over Earth's future, by Paul Sabin)
    [book review]

  • Gross M:
    Chemistry World online 24.1.2014
    Self-assembling carbohydrates behave like proteins
    [biochemistr] [FREE access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 1 (06.01.), R1-R4
    Fears for the woods and the trees
    As a new interactive satellite map presents a global picture of deforestation, trees are also increasingly exposed to spreading pests and diseases. Loss of forests to human activity or disease often removes vital ecosystem services, not least mitigation of the effects of climate change
    [environment]
    [Open access]

  • Gross M:
    Current Biology 24, No 2 (20.01.), R51-53
    Protect the coasts so they can protect us
    With rising sea levels and environmental problems caused by population and economic pressures colliding at the world’s coastlines, there are huge risks to people and the environment, but also opportunities to restore natural defences and help both.
    [climate change]
    [Open access]

 

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last update:

25.12.2016